Another Planet Can Orbit Proxima Centauri, The Star Closest To The Sun Seems Much Colder In Another World Than Earth
Another planet can orbit Proxima Centauri, the star closest to the sun seems much colder in another world than Earth

Another Planet Can Orbit Proxima Centauri, The Star Closest To The Sun Seems Much Colder In Another World Than Earth

Another planet can orbit Proxima Centauri, the star closest to the sun seems much colder in another world than Earth

illustrating the Next Centauri

The Star Proxima Centauri (illustrated) can confirm two planets, a possibly habitable world (left) and another potential planet recently discovered (right) more massive than Earth.

The planet that orbits the closest star to the Sun may be its neighbor.

It is known that Proxima Centauri, a dim red star just 4.2 light years away, is home to a potentially habitable planet, Proxima B, slightly taller than Earth (SN: 8/24/16) It is huge Now, astronomers They find signs of another planet, it is much larger and further from the star.

If it exists, Proxima C appears at least 5.8 times larger than Earth and orbits its star once every five Earth years, the researchers reported January 15 in Science Advances. Given its distance from Proxima Centauri, the planet is too cold to have liquid water, which is an important test for the habitat.

Clues about the existence of the planet appeared in the spectroscopic data of Proxima Centauri from two telescopes in Chile, Mario Demaso, astrophysicist at the Turin Astrophysical Observatory in Italy and reports from colleagues.

The data, which have a duration of 17 years, record the movement of the star from side to side in relation to the Earth. After considering the known planet, the researchers found signs of an additional inexplicable feasible, most likely caused by stars in the gravity of another planet.

Demaso’s team emphasized that additional data is needed to confirm the existence of the planet. Given the proximity of the Earth, Proxima C may be a leading candidate for direct imaging with the next-generation large-sized telescope, scientists say.

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New species of squid bobble discovered: Marine biologists have discovered a new species of the genus of fragmented squid Euprymna, known for its rich marine diversity, in the waters of the Ryuku Islands, Japan.

Bobet squids (Sepiolida Order) are small cephalopods found in the shallow coastal waters of the western Indo-Pacific, the eastern Atlantic coast and the Mediterranean Sea.

The common name of these marine animals comes from their characteristic gob (mantle).

Dr. of the Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University. Daniel Rokhsar and his colleagues declared: “Our goal was to describe the buffaloes of the Ryukas and establish them within the broader systemic framework of the Indo-Pacific Brielle squid.”

The researchers examined the strange squid along the Ryuku Islands up to 20 meters deep from shallow water.

“We found manure squid from three different species in these waters, and we showed them using cytochrome oxidase I sequences, transcriptome sequences and morphology.”

Two of these species were clearly related to Eupremna pardalota, a rebel squid known from northern Australia and a feast of Euprimna from Sagami Bay in mainland Japan. The third Ryukuan species was different in size and molecularly from other buffalo.

“We formally describe this new species and call it Eupremna brenneri in honor of Nobel laureate Dr. Sidney Brenner, founding president of the Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology,” the study authors said.

We propose the common name of Brenner in English and Berena-Mimica in Japanese. Euprimna brenneri, the eleventh species known in its genus, is a small squid, 8.5 to 22 mm in average length.

Adult specimens were found between corals and reefs in shallow waters near the sandy coast, at depths of less than 2 m. Their eggs were found in rocky areas near coral reefs at depths of 8-18 m.

In addition to its transcription sequence, we closely analyze its morphology, the scientists said. We saw different patterns of sprouts in their arms and tents. An article describing Euprymna brenneri was published in the journal Communications Biology.

New species of squid were discovered: marine biologists discovered a new species of the genus of the fragmented squid Euprimna, known for its rich marine diversity in the waters of the Ryuku Islands of Japan.

Bobet squid (order Sepiolida) are small cephalopods found in the shallow coastal waters of the western Indo-Pacific, the eastern Atlantic coast and the Mediterranean Sea. The common name of these marine animals comes from their characteristic gob (mantle).

Dr. of the Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University. Daniel Rokshar and his colleagues proclaim: Our goal was to describe the buffaloes of the Ryukas and establish them within the broader systemic framework of the Indo-Pacific Brile squid.

The researchers investigated strange squid along the Roku Islands at a depth of 20 meters from shallow water. We found squid manure from three different species in these waters, and we show them using cytochrome oxidase I sequences, transcriptome sequences and morphology.

Two of these species were clearly related to the Eupremna pardalota, a well-known rebel rebel from northern Australia and a feast of Sagami Bay on the mainland of Japan. The third species of Ryukuan differed in size and molecularly from other buffalo.

The study authors stated that we formally describe this new species and call it the Nobel Prize winner Dr. In honor of Sydney Brenner, says Eupremna Brenneri, the founding president of the Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology. We propose the generic name of Brenner in English and Berena-Mimica in Japanese.

Euprimna brenneri, the eleventh species known in its genus, is a small squid of 8.5 to 22 mm in average length. Adult specimens were found between corals and reefs in shallow waters near the sandy coast, at depths of less than 2 m.

Their eggs were found in rocky areas near coral reefs at a depth of 8-18 m. In addition to its transcription sequence, we carefully analyze its morphology, the scientists said.

We saw different patterns of buds on his arms and tents. An article describing Euprymna brenneri was published in the journal Communication Biology.

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