Bony Toothed Seabird Lived In New Zealand 1

Bony Toothed Seabird Lived In New Zealand

Bony Toothed Seabird Lived In New Zealand 62 Million Years Ago, Paleontologists Have Found The Remains Of A Bony Toothed SeabirdPaleontologists have found the remains of a pelgornitid bird that lived in New Zealand 62 million years ago (early Paleocene age).

Nicknamed Protodontoproteix ruthe, it belongs to the ancient seabird Pelagornithidae, an ancient family of Bony Toothed SeabirdsPreviously it was known that these seabirds dated from the fossil sites of the Paleocene to the Pliocene, and some species reached wings of up to 6.4 m (21 feet). Protodontopteryx is the oldest but youngest member of the Ruthe family.

It was only the size of an average Goole and, like other pelgornitids, had bony and tooth-like projections on the edge of its beak. A partial skeleton of Protodontopteryx ruthae was found on the Vepara Greensand fossil site in 2018 by amateur paleontologist Leah Love.

The age of fossil bones suggests that palagornites develop in the southern hemisphere, said the curator of the Canterbury Museum and lead author of an article published in the journal Papers in Paleontology. “While this bird was relatively small, the impact of its discovery is extremely important in our understanding of this family.

Until we found this skeleton, all really old pelagornites were found in the northern hemisphere, so everyone thought they had evolved there. New Zealand was a very different place when protodontoproteins were in heaven. It had a tropical climate, the sea temperature was around 25 ° C (77 ° F), so we had coral and giant turtles.

Researchers from the Senckenberg Research Institute and the Natural History Museum, Drs. Gerald Mayer said: The discovery of Protodontoprotex Ruth was really surprising and unexpected. The fossil is not only one of the most complete specimens of birds with pseudo legs, but also shows many unexpected skeletal features that contribute to a better understanding of the evolution of these cryptic birds.

The Protodontopteryx ruthae skeleton suggests that it was less suitable for long growing distances and probably covered much shorter distances than the last paleorganites. Its short and wide pseudotet was probably designed for fishing. Later species had needle-shaped pseudoteth, possibly used to capture prey with a soft body like squid.

Curator at the Canterbury Museum, Drs. Vanessa de Pietri said: “Because Protodontoprotex Ruth was less adapted to continuously grow than other known paleorganites, we can now say that the pseudoteth evolved.”

Bony Toothed Seabird lived in New Zealand 62 million years ago. Paleontology… Paleontologists have found the remains of a pelgornitid bird that lived in New Zealand 62 million years ago (early Paleocene age).

Nicknamed Protodontoproteix ruthe, it belongs to the ancient seabird Pelagornithidae, an ancient family of bony-tooth birds. Previously it was known that these seabirds dated from the fossil sites of the Paleocene to the Pliocene, and some species reached wings of up to 6.4 m (21 feet).

Protodontopteryx is the oldest but youngest member of the Ruthe family. It was only the size of an average Goole and, like other pelgornitids, had bony and tooth-like projections on the edge of its beak. A partial skeleton of Protodontopteryx ruthae was found on the Vepara Greensand fossil site in 2018 by amateur paleontologist Leah Love.

“The age of fossil bones suggests that palagornites develop in the southern hemisphere,” said the curator of the Canterbury Museum and lead author of an article published in the journal Papers in Paleontology.

While this bird was relatively small, the impact of its discovery is extremely important in our understanding of this family. Until we found this skeleton, all really old pelagornites were found in the northern hemisphere, so everyone thought they had evolved there.

“New Zealand was a very different place when protodontoproteins were in heaven. It had a tropical climate, the sea temperature was around 25 ° C (77 ° F), so we had coral and giant turtles. ” Researchers from the Senckenberg Research Institute and the Natural History Museum, Drs. Gerald Mayer said:

The discovery of Protodontoprotex Ruth was really surprising and unexpected. “The fossil is not only one of the most complete specimens of birds with pseudo legs, but also shows many unexpected skeletal features that contribute to a better understanding of the evolution of these cryptic birds.”

The Protodontopteryx ruthae skeleton suggests that it was less suitable for long growing distances and probably covered much shorter distances than the last paleorganites. Its short and wide pseudotet was probably designed for fishing. Later species had needle-shaped pseudoteth, possibly used to capture prey with a soft body like squid.

Curator at the Canterbury Museum, Drs. Vanessa de Pietri said: Because Protodontoprotex Ruth was less adapted to continuously grow than other known paleorganites, we can now say that the pseudoteth evolved.

Gerald Mayer et al. The oldest, smallest and most phylogenetically most basal pelgornito of the early Paleocene of New Zealand sheds light on the evolutionary history of the largest flying birds. Paleontology articles, published online on September 17, 2019 by netbij.com

 

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