Paleontologists Find Fossils Of Green Algae

Paleontologists find fossils of green algae of a billion years, paleontologists have discovered microscopic fossil remains of green algae near Dalian. Paleontologists have discovered microscopic fossil remains of green algae near Dalian in Liaoning Province in northern China.

The microfossils are approximately one billion years old. They represent a previously unknown species of green algae, called Proterocladus anticus, and are barely visible to the naked eye at 2 mm in length, or are approximately the size of a typical flea.

Proterocladus anticus (Virginia Tech image): The new fossils suggest that green algae were important actors in the ocean when their lands descended and took control of the dry land, said lead author Professor Shuhai Xiao, a researcher at the Center for Geology and Global Change in Virginia.

The entire biosphere depends heavily on plants and algae for food and oxygen, but land plants did not develop until about 450 million years ago. Our study shows that green algae did not develop a billion years ago, pushing back green algae records after about 200 million years.

What kind of food for marine algae does the marine ecosystem provide? The current hypothesis is that terrestrial trees, grasses, food crops, shrubs and even kudzu evolved from green algae, which were aquatic plants. Through geological time they ran out of water and acclimatized and prospered to dry land, their new natural environment.

“These fossils belong to the ancestors of all modern land plants that are seen today,” said Professor Xiao. However, the warning that not all geologists are on the same page continues to debate the origin of green plants. “Not everyone agrees with us; some scientists think that green plants began in rivers and lakes, and then conquered the sea and the land.

In the context of this digital entertainment, the old green algae Protocolladus anticus appears a billion years ago while living in the sea. There are similar algae in the fossilization process later in the foreground. In the context of this digital entertainment, the old green algae Protocolladus anticus appears a billion years ago while living in the sea.

There are similar algae in the fossilization process later in the foreground. Image sincerely: Dinghua Yang. There are three main types of algae: brown (phyophyceae), green (chlorophyta) and red (rhodophyta), and thousands of species of each type. Red algae fossils, now common at the bottom of the ocean, have been described as 1.047 billion years.

There are some modern green algae that look like the fossils we found, said Professor Xiao. A group of modern green algae, known as cyphonocadalion, are particularly similar in size and shape to the fossils we find.

Photosynthetic plants are, of course, important for the ecological balance of the planet because they produce organic carbon and oxygen through photosynthesis, and form the food and shelter base for an incalculable number of mammals, fish and more.

Provide…Even so, 2 billion years ago, Earth had no green plants in the oceans, Professor Xiao said. “Proterocladus anticus seaweed exhibits many branches, conspicuous growth and specialized cells known as fossils of this type,” said lead author Dr. Said King Tang, a postdoctoral researcher at the Center for Geosciences and Global Change in Virginia.

Together, these characteristics strongly suggest that the fossil is a green algae with multicellular complexes that are one billion years old. These possibilities represent the oldest fossils of green algae. In summary, our study suggests that the green plants we see today date back at least one billion years. The discovery of a billion-year-old ancestor of green algae from all plants.

Virginia Tech paleontologists have made a remarkable discovery in China: 1 billion-year-old lush green algae micro-fossils that may be related to the ancestor of the first terrestrial plants and trees that evolved 450 million years ago.

The oldest recorded green algae, the ancestor of all land plants, lived approximately 1 billion years ago, according to a new study. Scientists have discovered fossils that may be the oldest known green algae to date.

The newly discovered algae, called Proterocladus anticus, lived approximately one billion years ago and even though it was small, about 0.07 inches (2 millimeters) in length, the algae had an important role: they could produce oxygen through photosynthesis.

The discovery suggests that the green plants we see today date back at least a billion years, and that they expanded their territory on land before starting at sea, said study lead researcher King. Tang, a postdoctoral fellow in Virginia Tech’s geosciences department, told Live Science in an email.

Proterocladus anticus: This confirms that green algae already lived a billion years ago. Until now, researchers had no firm evidence that green algae lived long ago. Rather, computer models based on molecular clocks indicated that photosynthetic plants originated between the paleoproterozoic era (2.5 to 1.6 billion years ago).

The cryogenic period (720 to 635 million years ago). Now that researchers have a fossil, they can confidently say that photosynthetic plants, a group called a viridiplant, lived at least a billion years ago, and that they were multicellular, Tang said.

Previously, the most widely accepted green algae were around 800 million years old, said Tim, a postdoctoral fellow in the Department of Earth Sciences at Dartmouth College in Heleshire, New Hampshire, and a fellow in the Department of Geology and Geophysics at Yale University.

That said, it was not included in the study. “This work confirms what many expected based on existing, albeit sparse, fossil records that are likely green algae about a billion years ago.” Green algae: they played an important role in the maintenance of primitive ecosystems.

Tang and his colleagues discovered fossils near Dalian City in northern China’s Liaoning Province. He had heard that there were “a lot of well exposed sedimentary rocks” dating back almost a billion years before the Nunfen Formation.

So Tang took some of these ancient rocks, mostly shales and shales, to the Virginia Tech lab. Tung was “really excited” when he saw the algae fossil under a microscope. In total, it identified 1,028 samples. “I showed my supervisor [Shuai Xiao, a professor in the Virginia Tech Geoscience Department], and we immediately agreed that it was going to be a very interesting discovery,” he said.

Tang said that life on Earth depends on photosynthetic plants and algae to feed, but terrestrial plants did not grow until about 450 million years ago. “The new fossils show that green algae were important players in the sea before their descendants, land plants, took over,” he said.

Better understand the presence and development of plants – these fossils hail from an ancient ocean, but there’s still debate over where green algae originated. Xiao said in a statement. “Not everyone agrees with us; some scientists think that green plants started in rivers and lakes, and then conquered the sea and land.”

Also, green algae are not the oldest recorded algae. “There is strong evidence that red algae existed more than a billion years ago, and we know that red and green algae are derived from a common ancestor,” Gibson told Live Science in an email.

“So while this does not fundamentally change the way we think about life evolution, the discovery of this green algae fossil helps fill a significant gap and provides an emerging way for the development of an early and complex life.” Strengthens the timeline. “

The discovery is described in an article in the journal Nature Ecology and Evolution.

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