Thousands of Meerkat radio telescopes detect stellar galaxies

Thousands Of MeerKat Radio Telescopes Detect Stellar Galaxies

Galaxies like the distant Milky Way reveal the story of the universe’s star formation. Composite single-light views show thousands of radio-illuminated galaxies and the Meerkat Radio telescope array at the Kaoru Arsade in South Africa. The brightest spots are radio galaxies powered by luminous black holes.

Countless weak points are distant galaxies like our Milky Way, the weakest now being revealed earlier. Because radio waves travel at the speed of light, this image is a time machine that shows the history of the universe’s star formation. Image credit: NASA / ESA

Check out this new radio image covered in dots, each of which is a distant galaxy! The brightest spots are galaxies powered by supermassive black holes that glow brightly in radio light. But what makes this image special are the countless points that fill the sky. These are distant galaxies like ours that have never been seen in radio light before.

To learn about the history of the star formation of the universe, we need to look back in time. Galaxies throughout the universe have been forming stars for the past 13 billion years. But most stars were born 8-11 billion years ago, during an era known as cosmic noon. Studying the dim light that comes from this era has been a challenge for astronomers.

Optical telescopes can see very distant galaxies, but the new stars are largely hidden within dusty gas clouds. Radio telescopes can look through dust and observe rare galaxies, with bright stars, but they have not yet been so sensitive as to detect signals from distant galaxies similar to the Milky Way that most of the stars in the universe are responsible for the construction .

An international team of astronomers using the Miracat telescope at the South African Radio Astronomy Observatory (SARAO) recently sensitized the first radio observations to reveal these galaxies.

To create this image, we selected a region in the southern sky without strong radio sources whose brightness could blind a sensitive observation, said Tom Mauch of SARAO in Cape Town, South Africa, who led the team publishing their results The Astrophysical Journal.

The team used 64 Miracat plates to survey the area for 130 hours. The resulting image shows a region of the sky comparable to the region of five full moons, containing thousands of galaxiesBecause radio waves travel at the speed of light.

This image is a time machine that samples billions of star formation in these distant galaxies over billions of years, co-author James of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) in Charlottesville, Virginia Condon explained.

“Because only short-lived stars less than 30 million years old send radio waves, we know that the image is not polluted by old stars. The radio light we see from each galaxy is its star.” It is proportional to the construction rate.

That moment in time. ” Astronomers want to use this image to learn more about the formation of stars throughout the universe. These early results indicate that the rate of star formation around cosmic noon was originally higher than expected, said Allison Matthews, a graduate student at the University of Virginia at NRAO and a Groote Rebar PhD.

The previous images could only detect the tip of the iceberg, rare and luminous galaxies that produced only a small fraction of the stars in the universe. Now what we see is the complete image: these weak points are the galaxies that formed the most. Stars in the universe. “

“Only in recent years has technology evolved to the point that we can build brilliant telescopes like Mircat in South Africa and gain the computing power to create images like this and gain a real understanding of where the universe came from,” added the NRAO astronomer William Cotton. “Next-generation devices, square kilometer sets, and very large next-generation sets should be even more spectacular.”

Thousands of Meerkat radio telescopes detect stellar galaxiesA new radio image of the Miracat telescope at the South African Radio Astronomy Observatory in Cape Town, South Africa, presents a detailed image of the early Universe and contains thousands of young star-forming galaxies.

This composite image shows thousands of star-forming galaxies in light radio and the MiraCat radio telescope array in Carlo’s South African half centuryThe brightest points are the radio galaxies fed by luminous black holes. Countless weaknesses are distant star-forming galaxies like our Milky Way.

Which are very deadly, have not yet been detected. Because radio waves travel at the speed of light, this image is a time machine that shows the history of the star’s formation of the universeTo create this image, we selected an area in the southern sky that does not have strong radio sources whose brightness can blind a sensitive observation, said Dr.

An astronomer at the South African Astronomy Observatory. Tom Mauch said. Dr. Mauch and his team inspected the area for a total of 130 hours using 64 Miracat dishes. A researcher at the National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Drs. James Condon said.

Because radio waves travel at the speed of light, this image is a time machine formed over billions of years in these distant galaxies. Because only short-lived stars that are less than 30 million years old send radio waves, we know that the image is not contaminated by old stars.

So, the radio light we see in each galaxy is at that moment.” It is proportional to its star formation rate. ” The scientists plan to use this image, called the 1.28 GHz Meerat DEEP 2 image, to learn more about star formation in the early universe.

“These first results indicate that the rate of star formation around the cosmic afternoon was originally higher than originally expected,” said Dr. Alison Matthews, a graduate student at the University of Virginia and the National Radio Astronomy Observatory.

The previous images could only detect the tip of the iceberg, rare and luminous galaxies that produced only a small fraction of the stars in the universe. Now what we see is the complete image: these weak points are galaxies that form the majority of the stars In the universe.

“Only in recent years has Technology evolved to the point that we can build spectacular telescopes like MiraKet and have the computing power to create images like this and get a real understanding of how the universe came about.” It’s “Dr. William Cotton said, astronomer at the National Radio Astronomy Observatory.

“Next-generation devices, square kilometer assemblies and very large next-generation assemblies should be even more spectacular.” The new image of Mircat is described in an article that will be published in the Astrophysical Journal.

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